Struggling to Shake off Old Shackles – 20th Century Georgia

$40.00

Edited by WILLIAM F. HOLMES
Hardcover
0-88322-019-9

(Book Six) The final book in the Documentary History of Georgia series examines sharecropping, the vision of M.L. King, Jr., and Jimmy Carter's first political campaign.
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  • xxiv + 288 pages, frontispiece

Description


The last hundred years have brought dramatic and sometimes disturbing changes to Georgia. Big cities and their sprawling suburbs, industry and urban blight, as well as greater incomes, better educations and social reform, came inevitably, despite persistent poverty and race-hating demagogues. Some thirty documents, or groups of documents, give firsthand reports of sharecropping, race riots, lynchings, the chain gang, segregation and desegregation, Gene Talmadge’s “dictatorship,” the vision of M. L. King, Jr., Jimmy Carter’s first campaign. However, as Georgia hurtles into the future, the state’s identity and traditions are being sacrificed to a homogenized mass-market culture on an altar of uncertain “progress.” William F. Holmes is professor of history at the University of Georgia.

Book Six in the Documentary History of Georgia series.

Struggling to Shake Off Old Shackles, 20th Century Georgia, documentary history, William F. Holmes, Georgia, history, Georgia history, Southern history, American history, The South, America, African-American history, letters, journals, documents, industrialization, rural, urban, communications, government, national government, politics, blacks, whites, civil rights, corruption, Negro, Negroes, farmers, race, racial, racism, bigotry, prejudice, poverty, demagogues, sharecropping, segregation, desegregation, race riots, lynchings, mob, chain gang, Gene Talmadge, Martin Luther King Jr., Jimmy Carter, white supremacy, Ku Klux Klan, W.E.B. DuBois, Robert E. Burns, Erskine Caldwell, Calvin Trillin, Lester Maddox, Ivan Allen, prison, penal system, exploitation, peonage, servitude, tenant farming, Tobacco Road, planters, merchants, cotton, World War I, World War II, boll weevil, Great Depression, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, New Deal, agricultural diversification, tobacco, peanuts, poultry, cattle, hogs, textiles, Savannah, Columbus, Macon, Augusta, Atlanta, Henry Grady, Federal government, political power, Eugene Talmadge, industrial, military, William B. Hartsfield, Ivan Allen Jr., Forward Atlanta, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, civil rights movement, non-violence , violence, John A. Sibley, Sibley Committee, University of Georgia, integration,1965 Civil Rights Act, Maynard Jackson, Andrew Young, Democrat, Republican, discrimination, economic growth, Deep South, Charles F. Floyd, county unit system, Jim Crow, Jim Crow laws, intolerance, Tom Watson, Walter White, Booker T. Washington, NAACP, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Hugh M. Dorsey, race relations, Ellis Arnall, Carl Rowan, Ralph McGill, Charlayne Hunter, Hamilton Holmes, Zell Miller Slave Life in Georgia, A Narrative of the Life, Sufferings, and Escape of John Brown, A Fugitive Slave, F.N. Boney, slave life, slavery, Georgia, America, The South, antebellum, fugitive, John Brown, I.A. Chamerovzow, testimony, testimonials, British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, autobiography, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Canada, England, London, fugitive slave narrative, fugitive slave, plantation life, Georgia history, Southern history, American history, African-American history, Georgia social history, Southern social history, Benford, Fed, plantations, masters, slaves, blacks, whites, slave management, slave auctions, overseers, slave traders, underground railroad, slave system, abolitionists, bondage, Nat Turner, cotton fields, freedom, abolition movement, runaway slave, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Frederick Douglass, Henry Bibb, Solomon Northup, William Wells Brown, Josiah Henson, slave reminiscences, historical document, State Archives Building, Atlanta, Georgia State Archives, New Orleans, Mississippi

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